Special Regulations for the Evaluation of Astrophilately Exhibits at FIP Exhibitions

 

Article 1 Competitive Exhibitions
In accordance with Article 1.4 of the General Regulations of FIP for the Evaluation of Competitive Exhibits at FIP Exhibitions (GREV), these Special Regulations (SREV) have been developed to supplement those principles with regard to Astrophilately. Also, refer to Guidelines to Astrophilatelic Regulations.
Article 2 Competitive Exhibits (refer GREV Article 2)
An astrophilatelic exhibit is built up on historical, technical and scientific aspects related to space research and space programmes.
Article 3 Principles of Exhibit Composition (refer GREV Article 3)
Appropriate philatelic material of an astrophilatelic exhibit includes the following:

  1. Documents handed over by a postal administration for dispatch by stratosphere balloons, rockets, spaceships, rocket planes, recovery ships, rescue helicopters and other supporting aircraft or vice versa.
  2. Stamps, leaflets and vignettes related to rocket mail, postal stationery, Mailgrams and special envelopes and cards of relevance to the different parts of the space program, including: the related precursors; the launch, the flight and landing of space traveling objects; and the participating tracking stations, ships and supporting aircraft.
  3. Among the special characteristics of Astrophilately are envelopes and cards cancelled by the post office at the place and on the exact date of the special events.
  4. An astrophilatelic exhibit may encompass all aspects or relate to a self contained section only to the following: (for subdivisions refer Guidelines 3.4)
    1. From the period of pioneers to conquest of space
    2. Rocket Mail
    3. Space programmes of:

      USSR / CIS (Russia)
      USA
      Europe
      China
      Other countries

    4. Unmanned space programmes
    5. Manned space programmes
  5. The text should cover all aspects of the exact technical data, the dates, the place and the purpose or mission of the space objects, including the special activities of the astronauts and cosmonauts involved. 6. The plan or the concept of the exhibit shall be clearly laid out in an introductory statement (refer GREV Article 3.3).
Article 4 Criteria for Evaluating Exhibits (Refer GREV Article 4)
Treatment of the exhibit (refer GREV Article 4.3). Special value is attached to the exact technical evolution of the events.Philatelic and related Knowledge and personal Study and Research (refer GREV Article 4.5). A high degree of knowledge is also required on precursors related to space exploration and space flight.
Article 5 Judging of Exhibits (refer GREV Article 5)
5.1 Astrophilatelic exhibits will be judged by approved specialists in their respective field and in accordance with Section V (Article 31-47) of GREX (refer GREV Article 5.1).2. For astrophilatelic exhibits, the following relative terms are presented to lead the Jury to a balanced evaluation (refer GREV. Article 5.2)
Treatment and Philatelic Importance (20 / 10) 30
Philatelic and related Knowledge and Personal Study and Research 35
Condition and Rarity (10 / 20)  30
Presentation 5
Total 100
Article 6 Concluding Provision (refer GREV, Article 6)
6.1 In the event of any discrepancies in the text arising from translation, the English text shall prevail.
6.2 The Special Regulations for the Evaluation of Astrophilatelic Exhibits at FIP Exhibitions (SREV) have been approved by the 54th FIP Congress on 5th November 1985 in Rome. These revised SREV were ratified by the 61st FIP Congress on 4 May 1992 in Granada and come into force 1st January 1995. The updated Art 3.4 with addition of China was approved by the FIP Board and valid as from January 1st 2007.

Guidelines for Judging Astrophilatelic Exhibits

(Last revised March 2011)

Article1 Competitive Exhibitions
1.1 Basic Contents (refer GREV 1.1 – 1.4, SREV).
1.4.1 These Guidelines are intended to help the jurors and exhibitors to better understand the “Special Regulations for the Evaluation of Astrophilatelic Exhibits at FIP Exhibitions” (SREV).
Article 2 Competitive Exhibits
2.1 Basic Contents (refer GREV 2.1- 2.3, SREV).
2.1.1 An astrophilatelic exhibit comprises philatelic material related to the space exploration. It does not develop a theme. It is a philatelic study of the scientific and technical progress achieved in the conquest of space, including stratosphere research, early rocketry and the precursors to the various types of spacecraft, chronologically recording the relevant events within the different programmes.
Article 3 Principles of Exhibit Composition
3.1 Basic Contents (refer GREV 3.1, SREV).
3.2 Basic Contents (refer GREV 3.2, SREV).
3.2.1 The exhibit may also include varieties of stamps such as perforation, error in colour, overprints, as well as essays and proofs.
3.2.2 Mailgrams transmitted by satellites, covers carried around and on the Moon, stratosphere mail and space mail, and messages dispatched by rockets, may also be included.
3.2.3 Special cancellations for anniversaries of space events should be avoided except when no original event cancellation is available.
3.2.4 Faked items must be clearly identified.
3.3 Basic Contents (refer GREV 3.3, SREV).Special attention should be given to the origin of the postmarks and the date and time related to the different space events. Also of importance is the philatelic knowledge of the different types of postmarks applied for the same event.With regard to SREV 3.3 the following points are to be considered:
USSR / Russia Space Programmes
3.3.1 In the early period, as a rule, no announcement was made in advance of the launch site or date of a rocket or spaceship launch.
3.3.2 Prior to 1975 it is possible to record space events with stamps, postal stationery, envelopes and cards with special cancellations referring to the mission and duration of flight time.
3.3.3 From April 1975 onwards, official postmarks are available from the Cosmodrome Baïkonur recording the launch of space stations, supply and manned spaceships. The postmarks of the Cosmodrome are preferable to those of the official trading company.
3.3.4 Postmarks for launches should be shown from the post office nearby to the launch sites (Cosmodrome) with date of the event.
3.3.5 Space Mail is philatelic material that was flown aboard a spacecraft. Post Offices functioned in space stations from 1978 to March 2001.
3.3.6 For manned space programmes and for deep space missions (after launch) the postmark of the corresponding mission control centre, responsible for supervision, is valid. Postmarks from tracking sites and ships participating in the mission may be shown as a supplement if they are dated during the mission
3.3.7 Landings of spacecraft shall be recorded by the postmark of the post office nearest to the landing site.
USA Space Programmes
3.3.8 Envelopes and cards recording launches, landings or other space activities shall be postmarked with the exact date on which they took place.
3.3.9 Where the post office was closed at the time when launches, landings or other space activities took place, the postmark of the next working day is valid.
3.3.10 Postmarks for launches should be shown only from the post office nearby to the site of the launch.
3.3.11 Postmarks of the launch sites and different rocket test sites in the USA are valid. Envelopes and cards with an official NASA cachet applied at the post office in Kennedy Space Centre (KSC) from 1965 to 1975 are desirable.
3.3.12 Envelopes and cards recording splashdowns (landings) should have the postmark of the post office on board the main recovery ship with the date of recovery of the astronauts and/or space capsule. If not available on the ship, the postmark of the port of landing or of the nearest supply base after arrival of the ship is valid.Mail from ships, helicopters and/or airplanes participating in the recovery shall be postmarked with a date during the mission.Recovery ships covers can have additional official cachets, referring to the mission.Space Shuttle landings shall be recorded by the postmark of the post office nearby to the landing site.
3.3.13 For the different missions (after the launch), within the scope of the US space programmes, the postmarks of the corresponding mission control centre responsible for the supervision are valid for manned programmes, for earth orbiting satellites and for lunar and space probes.Postmarks from tracking stations and ships participating in the mission may be shown as a supplement.Covers and cards with the official cachet are of primary interest.
European Space Programmes
3.3.14 Postmarks recording the launch of satellites and/or research and experimental rockets should be shown from the post-offices of the launch sites in chronological order within the different programmes including the Europe/USA and the Europe/USSR co-operation programmes. Covers with an additional official ESA cachet (from 1979 onwards, Kourou) are of particular interest. Since the development of the first space rocket A4/V2 in Germany during World War II was top secret, this important period in space exploration can be recorded by philatelic items not relating to the launch date of an A4/V2 but showing the postmark of place and/or additional specific marks referring to a military unit or a detachment, which can be demonstrated to have been responsible for the development and/or the construction of such rockets
3.3.15 After launch, the mission control centre responsible for the supervision is usually ESOC/Darmstadt and to some extent GSOC/Oberpfaffenhofen. For different national space programmes the national mission control centres are responsible.Postmarks from tracking sites participating in the mission may be shown as a supplement.
China Space Programmes
3.3.16 In the early period, no announcement was made in advance of the launch site or date of a rocket or satellite launch
3.3.17 Prior to 1986, it was not possible to obtain a record of space activities. There were no postmarks from the launch site, date cancellations of space events or special cancellations for the event. Thus the early period may be covered by philatelic items as mentioned at 3.2.3.
3.3.18 After 1986, postmarks recording launches of spacecraft should only be shown from the post office nearby the launch site with the exact date of the event.
3.3.19 Flown covers from unmanned recoverable satellites, or manned spacecraft may be included.
3.3.20 For the missions of unmanned and manned space programmes (after launch) the postmark of the corresponding mission control centre, responsible for the supervision of the spacecraft is valid. Postmarks from tracking stations, ships and supporting aircrafts may be shown as a supplement if they are dated during the mission.
3.3.21 Landings of unmanned and manned spacecraft shall be recorded by the postmark of the post office nearby to the landing site.
Other Countries Participating in Space Programmes
3.3.22 For launches the postmarks of the post office nearby to launch sites are valid. There are also postmarks of temporary launching places for rockets and/or stratosphere balloon ascents known as well as postmarks of national mission control centres.
3.4 Basic Contents (refer GREV 3.4, SREV).An astrophilatelic exhibit may encompass all aspects or relate to a self contained section.Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:
3.4a From the period of Pioneers to the Conquest of space:
Such an exhibit may comprise

  • those astronomers and scientists who contributed by their researches to modern space exploration and space flight,
  • early experimental rocketry, mainly related to rocket mail experiments,
  • rocket pioneers and their inventions,
  • unmanned and manned stratosphere balloon research flights,
  • experimental rocket plane flights,
  • the development of the first space rocket A4/V2 (see 3.3.14),
  • rocket and satellite launches of all countries with space activities and manned space flights.
3.4b Rocket mail
Such an exhibit should consist of flown items by rockets constructed by key rocket pioneers who by their technical and scientific inventions contributed to later conquest of space.Postal stationary, rocket stamps, vignettes issued for the purpose of rocket mail flights, reduced newspapers and messages transported by rockets as well as covers carried into space by rockets and spaceships may be utilized.
3.4c Space programmes of:1. USSR/Russia

  • rocket pioneers and their inventions,
  • stratosphere balloon research flights,
  • the different programmes of unmanned and manned space flights from Sputnik I until the Intercosmos programmes, including the related precursors and Space Mail.

2. USA

  • early experimental rocketry performed by rocket pioneers also related to rocket mail,
  • unmanned and manned stratosphere balloon research and experimental rocket plane flights,
  • the programme of unmanned and manned space flights, including the related precursors, as well as covers flown into stratosphere and space.

3. Europe

  • the astronomers and scientists who paved the way by their laws for modern space exploration,
  • the rocket mail experiments carried out in various countries,
  • the stratosphere balloon research flights,
  • the first space rocket A4 (V2),
  • the experimental rocket launches for different scientific purposes undertaken by several countries, sometimes in co-operation with the USA and USSR,
  • the ELDO, ESRO and ESA programmes,
  • the European space launcher “ARIANE”, and
  • the European co-operation on missions performed during manned and unmanned multinational space flights.

4. China

  • The programmes of unmanned and manned space flights, as well as covers flown into space.

5. Other countries

  • Other countries with private or state-owned space programmes and launch sites, such as Australia, India, Japan, etc. may be utilized shown by recording the different rocket and satellite launches and the purpose of their mission.
3.4d Unmanned Space Programmes1. Astronomy
The exploration of the Moon, the Sun, the planets and star systems by use of stratosphere balloons, rockets, satellites and space probes recording the various events, and also the related precursors.2. Meteorology
The beginning of weather forecasting and the use of observatories, research balloons and high altitude ballistic rockets, with emphasis on modern data collection and transmission by recording the launches of the various types of meteorological satellites.

3. Telecommunication
Following a brief survey on the initial means of transmitting news, show the progress in technology from the launch of the first telecommunication balloon and satellite test flights to the present world-wide network of different types of telecommunication satellites launched by activities of participating countries.

4. Exploration of the Earth
The progress in exploring the Earth’s magnetic field, the atmosphere, and the radiation belts, as well as geographic, geodesy and geological data collection by use of stratosphere balloons, rockets and satellites.Exhibits related to 3.4d 1 to 3.4d 4 may also include astrophilatelic material recording the deployment of satellites referring to one of these headings, e.g. during Space Shuttle and Ariane missions. Covers recording space events referring to research work performed by astronauts or cosmonauts during manned space missions are not suitable for an exhibit mounted in accordance with 3.4.d) but may be displayed in an exhibit related to 3.4e or 3.4c 1-2.

5. Beginning of Conquest of Space
The beginning of space research programmes of the International Geophysical Year 1957/58 and the International Geophysical Cooperative Year 1959 are an acceptable way to introduce this study.

3.4e Manned Space Programmes
Manned space flights of USSR/Russia, USA, China and multinational flights as well as the missions performed by the astronauts/cosmonauts are the basis of this study. The space events of all countries or one country may be shown in chronological order. The related precursors (e.g. scientific and medical manned stratosphere balloons, rocket plane flights, rocket experiments with animals, capsule recoveries, tests of survival equipment, test flights of satellites and rocket carriers) may be included together with space probes exploring the Moon.
3.5 Basic Contents (refer GREV 3.5, SREV).
3.6 Basic Contents (refer GREV 3.3 – 3.5, SREV 3.6). The displayed objects shall fully correspond with the title and the chosen subject.
Article 4 Criteria for Evaluating Exhibits
Basic Contents (refer GREV 4.1 – 4.7, SREV 4.3 & 4.5).
Article 5 Judging of Exhibits
Basic Contents (refer GREV 5.1 – 5.9, SREV 5.1 & 5.2).
Article 6 Concluding Provision
Basic Contents (refer GREV 6.1 – 6.2, SREV).
Conclusions These Guidelines are not intended to provide an answer to every possible exhibitor’s question; nevertheless we hope that this advice will help the jury and the exhibitor to better understand the regulations. In the event of any discrepancies in the text arising from translation, the English text shall prevail.